IDENTIFICATION OF ANTIULCER ACTIVITY BY INSILICO METHOD IN SELECTED MEDICINAL PLANTS

Main Article Content

R. SHARMILA
S. P. RAJA RAJESHWARI
T. I. REVATHY
R. SARONA
M. SAPPANA SHREE
A. PREETHI
N. PRASANTH
K. AKILA

Abstract

Ulcer occurs when stomach acid damages the lining of the digestive tract caused by the bacteria Helicobacter pylori. Many pharmacological activities such as antiulcer activity can act against ulcer. Medicinal plants like Mimosa pudica and Vachellia nilotica has the antiulcer activity in a wide range. To study the antiulcer activity in medicinal plants using insilco studies by comparing the phytocompounds of plants with histamine 2 receptor as a binding protein, which is present in the stomach lining of homosapiens. Histamine 2 receptor was modelled using Swiss model and the ligand structures are obtained from PUB-CHEM, viewed easily via PYMOL. All the phytocompounds showed good binding energy with modelled protein on the docking methodology. Specifically ascorbic acid exhibited the lower binding energy of value -3.24 kcal/mol, indole and catechin shows highest binding energy of value -4.99 kcal/mol and -4.98 kacl/mol respectively. The results can be useful for the design and development of phytocompounds having better inhibitory activity against several types of ulcer.

Keywords:
Histamine 2 receptor, homology modeling, docking, mimosins, binding interactions

Article Details

How to Cite
SHARMILA, R., RAJESHWARI, S. P. R., REVATHY, T. I., SARONA, R., SHREE, M. S., PREETHI, A., PRASANTH, N., & AKILA, K. (2021). IDENTIFICATION OF ANTIULCER ACTIVITY BY INSILICO METHOD IN SELECTED MEDICINAL PLANTS. Asian Journal of Advances in Medical Science, 3(4), 119-126. Retrieved from http://mbimph.com/index.php/AJOAIMS/article/view/2482
Section
Original Research Article

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