A MANIKIN DEVICE FOR DEMONSTRATING A HUMAN BODY

Main Article Content

YADAV TRUPTI SAURABH

Abstract

Introduction: Demonstrating the movement of a human body in relation to axis and planes that can be used to train health practitioners or a medical professional has always a difficult task. Currently, people use cardboard and pencils for demonstrating the movements of the human body such as axes, planes, and the like.

Object of the Research: An object of the present research is to provide a manikin device for demonstrating movement of a human body. Another object of the present research is to provide a manikin device for demonstrating movement of a human body, which can be used as medical equipment for educational purposes or to train health practitioners.

Methods: For the present research, a device has been devised. The experimentation and the configuration have been conducted at KIMS Karad.

Results: According to the present research, there is provision with a manikin device for demonstrating movement of a human body. The manikin device is having a framework which comprises articulated blocks of the human body. In the present embodiment, the blocks are a hollow housing provided to configure the parts of the human body. Specifically, the blocks are articulated to configure the human's body part such as legs, hands, thorax region, pelvis region, and head.

Conclusion: The present research is to provide a manikin device for demonstrating movement of a human body. The manikin device  is having a framework which comprises articulated blocks of the human body.

Keywords:
Manikin device, human body, medical equipment, pelvis region, physiotherapy

Article Details

How to Cite
SAURABH, Y. T. (2021). A MANIKIN DEVICE FOR DEMONSTRATING A HUMAN BODY. UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, 42(24), 15-18. Retrieved from http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2641
Section
Short Research Article

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