AN INTRAMUSCULAR AND SUBCUTANEOUS INJECTION PROCESS FOR ADMINISTERING DRUGS

Main Article Content

RAJASHRI BHAGWAT KARALE

Abstract

An injection guide comprises a holder being cylindrical shape. The holder is having a provision for insertion of a syringe. A base frame means to support for the syringe holder; primary angle unit and secondary angle unit, said units having a predetermined degree of angle varying from  to a primary pointer and a secondary pointer, the primary pointer and the secondary pointer being connected to primary angle unit and secondary angle unit respectively. A slit being oval shape means to insert the needle; said slit being centrally placed in the said injection guide.

Aim and Objective: To provide am anually operated intramuscular and subcutaneous injection process.

Methods: Injections are administered invarious angles. Intramuscular injection is administered at 90°.Subcutaneous injection is at 45°.Intravenous injection is administered at 20° and intradermal injection is at 10 to15°. Many times errors in administration of injections were noted by health care professionals and as a result patient suffers from the complications which sometimes very severe and even in the case, the death might be happened due to this error.

Results: For intravenous (20° angle), intramuscular (90° angle) and intradermal (10° angle)injection, except length of the syringe holder, the dimension of other components was varied and it was selected as per the type of the injection.

Conclusion: Not only primary and secondary angle unit of the device but also length of the syringe holder is critical in order to achieve the desired angle for the injection.

Keywords:
Subcutaneous, intra-dermal, intramuscular, syringe, injection process

Article Details

How to Cite
KARALE, R. B. (2021). AN INTRAMUSCULAR AND SUBCUTANEOUS INJECTION PROCESS FOR ADMINISTERING DRUGS. UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, 42(24), 85-90. Retrieved from http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2660
Section
Original Research Article

References

Hunter J. Intramuscular injection techniques. Nursing Standard. 2008;22(24).

Deutsch J, Jolliffe C, Archer E, Leece EA. Intramuscular injection of alfaxalone in combination with butorphanol for sedation in cats. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. 2017;44(4):794-802.

Malkin B. Are techniques used for intramuscular injection based on research evidence. Nursing Times. 2008;104(50/51):48-51.

Thomas CM, Mraz M, Rajcan L. Blood aspiration during IM injection. Clinical Nursing Research. 2016;25(5):549-59.

Girish GN, Ravi MD. Vaccination related pain: comparison of two injection techniques. The Indian Journal of Pediatrics. 2014;81.

Salari M, Estaji Z, Akrami R, Rad M. Comparison of skin traction, pressure, and rapid muscle release with conventional method on intramuscular injection pain: A randomized clinical trial. Journal of Education and Health Promotion. 2018;7.

Porter C, Brimhall J. porter. Mickelson Gallery; 1964.

Wu MH, Huang SB, Lee GB. Microfluidic cell culture systems for drug research. Lab on a Chip. 2010; 10(8):939-56.

Bachta W, Renaud P, Laroche E, Forgione A, Gangloff J. Cardiolock: An active cardiac stabilizer. First in vivo experiments using a new robotized device. Computer Aided Surgery. 2008;13(5):243-54.

Grist JT, McLean MA, Riemer F, Schulte RF, Deen SS, Zaccagna F, Gallagher FA. Quantifying normal human brain metabolism using hyperpolarized [1–13C] pyruvate and magnetic resonance imaging. Neuroimage. 189:171-179.

Kam KF, Robinson MP, Gilbert MA, Pelah A. Modelling Framework and Assistive Device for Peripheral Intravenous Injections. Open Engineering. 2016;6(1).