CO-INFECTION IN PYREXIA OF UNKNOWN ORIGIN AMONG PATIENTS ADMITTED AT A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

Main Article Content

ASMAT JAHAN
PRACHI BHARGAVA
RAJ KUMAR KALYAN
SANJEEV KUMAR VERMA
KAMLESH KUMAR GUPTA
RENU KUMARI

Abstract

Background: Pyrexia of unknown origin has become a major problem in developing countries including India. In tropical region during monsoon and post-monsoon period there are high chances of dual infection and cross reactivity. The objective of the present study was to find incidence of co-infection among patients with Pyrexia of unknown origin.

Methods: This was a hospital based prospective study conducted over a period of One year (January to December) in 2018 in the department of microbiology. A total of 80 PUO cases were collected from different wards of King George’s Medical University, Lucknow, UP, India. Serological methods were applied for diagnosis of infection.

Results: In this study a total of 80 pyrexia cases were studied, of those 80 pyrexia cases, 27(33.75%) of pyrexia cases were detected due to infection of which co infection contributed to 7/80(8.75%) and single infection were detected in 20(25%). The most common co-infection was Leptospirosis and Scrub typhus reported in 3 patients while Leptospirosis and Malaria was observed in one patient.

Conclusion: This study showed presence of dual infection as a cause of PUO. Serology-based investigations played a vital role in establishing diagnosis.

Keywords:
PUO, ELISA, scrub typhus, leptospirosis, co-infection

Article Details

How to Cite
JAHAN, A., BHARGAVA, P., KALYAN, R. K., VERMA, S. K., GUPTA, K. K., & KUMARI, R. (2021). CO-INFECTION IN PYREXIA OF UNKNOWN ORIGIN AMONG PATIENTS ADMITTED AT A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL. UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, 42(24), 332-335. Retrieved from http://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/2702
Section
Short Communication

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