PRACTICES, PERCEPTION AND CHALLENGES OF ACTIVE LEARNING IN PRIMARY SCHOOLS OF MIRAB ABAYA WOREDA GAMO GOFA ZONE

Main Article Content

FASIL GIRMA
CHOMBE ANAGAW

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the practice, perception and the challenges of active learning in Mirab abaya woreda Gamo Gofa zone. To realize these purposes three basic questions were formulated. To address these questions the descriptive survey method was employed. In this study the primary source of data were teachers, school principals, supervisors and students of the selected schools. The questionnaires were distributed to 92 students, 47 teachers, and interviews were made with 6 directors and 3 cluster supervisors drawn from 6 schools. The sampling method used to select teachers and students was simple random sampling and directors and supervisors were selected using purposive sampling. The Data collection tools are questionnaires, semi structured interview and observation. The data obtained through questionnaires were quantitatively analyzed and interpreted in light of available literature, whereas the information obtained through interview and observation were qualitatively described to supplement the quantitative data. To analyze data descriptive statistics like percentage, mean, and standard deviations was used. Moreover, independent t-test and one way ANOVA was used. Based on the data analysis the following major findings were obtained. The study revealed that the majority of teachers have good understanding of active learning but they has problem in the implementation process, There is inbuilt supervision in schools to monitor and follow instructional process, There is lack of training about active learning method for teachers to update their knowledge and skill, Teachers are teaching students in traditional (teacher centred) method of teaching rather than student centre, There is no effective implementation of active learning across schools. Concerning the factors tendency of teachers to use teacher centered approach, tendency of students to be passive receiver of knowledge, shortage of time, workload, and large class size was also found to be as the major problem that affecting the implementation of active learning. Based on these findings, it was safely concluded that the implementation of active learning in selected schools has their own limitation that need improvement. Finally, it was recommended that teachers should show their commitment and put theoretical knowledge into practice, Supervisors and school directors in collaboration with Woreda education office should facilitate different short term training on active learning.

Keywords:
Practice, perception, active learning, challenge.

Article Details

How to Cite
GIRMA, F., & ANAGAW, C. (2020). PRACTICES, PERCEPTION AND CHALLENGES OF ACTIVE LEARNING IN PRIMARY SCHOOLS OF MIRAB ABAYA WOREDA GAMO GOFA ZONE. Asian Journal of Advances in Research, 3(4), 6-21. Retrieved from https://mbimph.com/index.php/AJOAIR/article/view/1531
Section
Original Research Article

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