A PHENOMENOLOGICAL STUDY OF PERCEIVED ANXIETY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS ON ACADEMIC JOB INTERVIEW IN ILORIN, NIGERIA

PDF

Published: 2021-07-24

Page: 690-699


OLUWAGBEMIGA OYINLOLA *

Medical Social Services Department, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.

ALI ARAZEEM ABDULLAHI

Department of Sociology, University of Ilorin, University Road, Tanke, Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria and Department of Sociology, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park, South Africa.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

A phenomenological research design was deployed to examine the perceived anxiety and its implications of the academic job interview in a recently concluded interview setting at the University of Ilorin, Nigeria. A total of 25 participants were purposively selected to participate in the study. Data were analysed using content analysis. The result of the content analysis revealed that applicants who went through stress, nervousness and poor coping skills were triggered by personal factors while agony aswas triggered from external and they all had negative implications on interview performance. Also from the content analysis, participants reported unnecessary delay and extension of interview days had tendencies to elevate anxiety and state of melancholy among the applicants. Participants reported poor organisation on the part of the organisers and poor preparation of the applicants' students were other factors that affected the levels of nervousness, anxiety and agony during the job interview. However, anxiety and nervousness were moderated by previous job experiences of some applicants. Applicants into the lower academic positions were more likely than those applying for senior positions to feel more anxious and nervous. The study made recommendations to both applicants and the University administration on the need for providing a cushion effect towards reduction of anxiety among job seekers of academic positions in the country.

Keywords: Academic applicant, anxiety, job interview, mental health, phenomenology


How to Cite

OYINLOLA, O., & ABDULLAHI, A. A. (2021). A PHENOMENOLOGICAL STUDY OF PERCEIVED ANXIETY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS ON ACADEMIC JOB INTERVIEW IN ILORIN, NIGERIA. Asian Journal of Advances in Research, 4(1), 690–699. Retrieved from https://mbimph.com/index.php/AJOAIR/article/view/2309

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Tross SA, Maurer TJ. The effect of coaching interviewees on subsequent interview performance in structured experience-based interviews. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology. 2008;81(4):589–605.

Ajala EM. Perceived correlation between organisational justice and employees’ organisational citizenship behaviours in the civil service of Ondo and Oyo States, Nigeria. Ife Psychologia. 2016;24(1):1–11.

Sackett PR, Lievens F. Personnel selection. Annual Review of Psychology. 2008;59(1): 419–450.

Schaubroeck J, Ganster DC, Fox ML. Dispositional affect and work-related stress. Journal of Applied Psychology. 1992;77(3): 322–335.

McCarthy J, Goffin R. Measuring job interview anxiety: Beyond weak knees and sweaty palms. Personnel Psychology. 2004;57(3):607–637.

Kwon JH, Powell J, Chalmers A. How level of realism influences anxiety in virtual reality environments for a job interview. International Journal of Human-Computer Studies. 2013;71: 978-987.

Blake E, Casanueva J, Nunez D. Presence as a means for understanding user behaviour in virtual environments. South African Computer Journal. 2000;26:247–251.

Ogunbameru BO, Gwary MM, Idrisa YL, Ani AO, Yero AB. Empowerment of women through urban development in Maiduguri Metropolitan, Borno State. Proceedings of the 11th Annual Conference of The Agricultural Extension Society of Nigeria, 3rd-6th April; 2006.

Gielen AC, Schils T. Non-standard employment patterns across occupations in the Netherlands. In W. Eichhorst, & P. Marx (Eds.). Non-standard employment in post-industrial labour markets: An occupational perspective. Cheltenham, UK, Edward Elgar Publishing. 2015;52–88.

Feiler AR, Powell DM. Interview anxiety across the sexes: Support for the sex-linked anxiety coping theory. Personality and Individual Differences. 2013;54(1):12–17.

Bonaccio S, Reeve CL, Winford EC. Text anxiety on cognitive ability test can result in differential predictive validity of academic performance. Personality and Individual Differences. 2012;52(4):497– 502.

Tamres LK, Janicki D, Helgeson VS. Sex differences in coping behaviour: a meta-analytic review and an examination of relative coping. Personality and Social Psychology Review. 2002;6(1):2-30.

McCarthy J, Goffin R. Measuring job interview anxiety: Beyond weak knees and sweaty palms. Personnel Psychology. 2004;57(3):607–637.

Carless SA, Imber A. Job and organizational characteristics: A construct evaluation of applicant perceptions. Educational and Psychological Measurement. 2007;67(2):328–341.

Ruben MA, Hall JA, Schmid Mast M. Smiling in a job interview: When less is more. Journal of Social Psychology. 2015;155(2):107– 126.

Guerrero LK. Observer ratings of nonverbal involvement and immediacy. In V. Manusov & M. L. Patterson (Eds.), The sourcebook of nonverbal measures: Going beyond words. Mahwah, NJ, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 2005;221–235.

Walsh LC, Boehm JK, Lyubomirsky S. Does happiness promote career success? revisiting the evidence. Journal of Career Assessment, 2018;26(2):199–219.

Cheng BH, McCarthy JM. Understanding the dark and bright sides of anxiety: A theory of workplace anxiety. Journal of Applied Psychology. 2018;103(5):537– 560.

Ayres J, Keereetaweep T, Chen PE, Edwards PA. Communication apprehension and employment interviews. Communication Education. 1998;47(1):1-17.

Huffcutt AI, Van Iddekinge CH, Roth PL. Understanding applicant behavior in employment interviews: A theoretical model of interviewee performance. Human Resource Management Review. 2011;21(4):353–367.

Rubin HJ, Rubin IS. Qualitative interviewing: The art of hearing data. New Bury Park, CA: Sage; 1995.

Bureau of Statistics. Nigeria youth unemployment rate 1999-2019; 2019. Retrieved April, 10, 2020, from www.statista,com.

Levine SP, Feldman RS. Women and men’s nonverbal behavior and self- monitoring in a job interview setting. Applied Human Resource Management Research. 2002;7:1–14.

Macan T. The employment interview: A review of current studies and directions for future research. Human Resource Management Review. 2009;19:203–218.

Boyer L, Carden L, Johnson L, Boyd R. Establishing an interview anxiety baseline: Assessing applicants’ readiness. Business and Professional Communication Quarterly. 2017;80(3):365–378.

Rivera LA. Go with your gut: Emotion and evaluation in job interviews. American Journal of Sociology. 2015;120:1339-1389.

Himle JA, Weaver A, Bybee D, O’Donnell L, Vlnka S, Laviolette W, Levine DS. Employment barriers, skills, and aspirations among unemployed job seekers with and without social anxiety disorder. Psychiatric Services. 2014;65(7):924–930.

DeGroot T, Gooty J. Can nonverbal cues be used to make meaningful personality attributions in employment interviews? Journal of Business and Psychology. 2009;24:179– 192.

Walsh LC, Boehm JK, Lyubomirsky S. Does happiness promote career success? revisiting the evidence. Journal of Career Assessment, 2018;26(2):199–219.

Blume BD, Dreher GF, Baldwin TT. Examining the effects of communication apprehension within assessment centres. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology. 2010;83:663-671.

Browning BW, Cunningham JR. Students better be on their best behaviour: How to prepare for the most common job interviewing technique. Communication Teacher. 2012;26: 152-157.