INFLUENCE OF MOTHER'S NUTRITIONAL KNOWLEDGE ON DIETARY INTAKE OF JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS IN ASABA METROPOLIS OF DELTA STATE, NIGERIA

Full Article - PDF

Published: 2022-04-12

Page: 711-718


ABANOBI, CHIDINMA, HOPE *

Department of Home Economics Education, Federal College of Education (Technical), Asaba, Delta State, Nigeria.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

The study investigated mothers’ nutritional knowledge on dietary intakes of junior secondary school students in Asaba metropolis of Delta State. Three research questions and a null hypothesis guided the study. The study adopted a descriptive survey research design. The population of the study comprised mothers of junior secondary school students in Asaba metropolis. The sample of this study was 105 mothers drawn through purposive random sampling technique from five public junior secondary schools in Asaba metropolis of Delta State. The instrument used for data collection was a structured questionnaire constructed by the researcher and titled Mother's Nutritional Knowledge on Dietary Intake of Students Questionnaire (MNKDISQ). The instrument was validated by two experts. The reliability coefficient of the instrument was 0.71 using Cronbach Alpha technique. The data collected were analyzed using mean, standard deviation and Pearson product moment correlation. The null hypothesis was tested at 0.05 level of significance using Pearson product moment correlation statistics. The findings revealed that mothers in Asaba metropolis to a high extent have nutritional knowledge, the extent of dietary intake of Junior secondary school students in Asaba metropolis is high, there is a positive high relationship between mothers’ nutritional knowledge and dietary intake of junior secondary school students in Asaba metropolis, and the relationship between mothers’ nutritional knowledge and dietary intake of junior secondary school students in Asaba metropolis is significant. Based on the findings, It was recommended among others that mothers should always endeavor to acquire nutritional knowledge which will enable them ensure that their children have a better nutrition throughout their growing stage. Mothers should ensure that their children avoid junk foods at all cost as this will help them stay healthy and sound.

Keywords: Nutrition, nutritional knowledge, Mother’s Nutritional Knowledge, dietary intake


How to Cite

CHIDINMA, HOPE, A. (2022). INFLUENCE OF MOTHER’S NUTRITIONAL KNOWLEDGE ON DIETARY INTAKE OF JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS IN ASABA METROPOLIS OF DELTA STATE, NIGERIA. Asian Journal of Advances in Research, 5(1), 711–718. Retrieved from https://mbimph.com/index.php/AJOAIR/article/view/2954

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Newman T. Nutrition: Nutrients and the role of the dietitian and nutritionist; 2020.

Available: www.medicalnewstoday.com

Ihiensenkhien & Selami; 2014.

Nwabah N. Foods and nutrition for schools and colleges. Benin City: Adroit Book Company; 2015.

World Health Organization. Nutrition; 2007

Available: http://www.who.int/nutrition/en/

Worsley A. Nutrition knowledge and food consumption: Can nutrition knowledge change food behaviour? Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2002;11:579-585.

Glewwe P, Miguel E. The impact of child health and nutrition on education in developing countries. Handbook of Development Economics. 2008;4.

Antia FP, Abraham P. Clinical dietetics and nutrition; 2002.

Available: http://bit.1ufDAXn.

Blaylock J, Variyam JN, Lin B. Maternal nutrition knowledge and children's diet quality and nutrient intakes. US Department of Agriculture, ERS; 1999.

Ruel MT, Habicht J, Pindtrup-Anderson P, Grohn Y. The effects of maternal nutrition knowledge on the association between maternal schooling and child nutrition status in Lesotho. American Journal of Epidemiology. 1992;135:904–914.

Ruel MT, Levin CE, Armah-Klemesu M, Maxwell D, Morris SS. Good care practices can mitigate the negative effects of poverty and low maternal schooling on children’s nutritional status: evidence from Accra. World Development. 1999;27:1993–2009.

Glewwe P, Kremer M. Schools, teachers, and education outcomes in developing countries. Handbook of Economics of Education. 2006;2.

Webb P, Block S. Nutrition information and formal schooling as inputs to child nutrition. Economic Development and Cultural Change. 2004;801-820.

Grant K, Stone T. Maternal comprehension of home based growth charts and its effects on growth. Journal of Tropical Pediatrics. 1986;32:255–257.

Walia BN, Gambhir SK. The relationship between childhood malnutrition and maternal knowledge and beliefs regarding nutrition. Indian Pediatrics. 1975;12:563–568.