Analyzing the Profitability of Crop Rotation Patterns in Peshawar, Pakistan

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Published: 2023-10-31

Page: 589-599


Hamza Masud

Department of Agronomy, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan.

Abdul Haseeb

Department of Agricultural & Applied economics, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan.

Uzair Ahmed *

Department of Agronomy, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan.

Ikram Ullah

Department of Agronomy, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan.

Sajid Ali

Department of Agronomy, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan.

Haseebullah

Department of Agronomy, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan.

Shams ur Rehman

Department of Agronomy, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan.

Muhammad Taimoor

Department of Agronomy, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan.

Muhammad Atif

Department of Agronomy, The University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

A study was conducted in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa on comparison of six cropping patterns (CP1 to CP6). The study utilized the data that were used to find out the total cost of input-output from the six cropping patterns taken from the official record, of ARF, University of Agriculture Peshawar for the 2020-21 seasons. The objective of the study was to compare six different cropping patterns to determine the most profitable options for farmers in the region. Findings showed that the area allocated to berseem crop and berseem (2 cuts + seed) were 24 acres, where total input cost from berseem and berseem (2 cuts + seed) were Rs. 21,460 PKR and Rs. 21,220 PKR per acres, the total income from berseem and berseem (2 cuts + seed) were Rs. 69,000 PKR and Rs. 89,900 PKR per acres. The area allocated to oat crop and oats (1cuts + seed) were 18.5 acres, where total input cost from oat and oats (1cuts + seed) were Rs. 21,180 PKR per acres, the total income from oat and oats (1cuts + seed) were Rs. 45,500 PKR and 53,500 PKR per acres. The area allocated to wheat crop was 69 acres, where total input cost from wheat Rs. 29,450 PKR per acre, the total income from wheat Rs. 66,286 PKR per acre. The area allocated to brassica crop was 5 acres, where total input cost from brassica Rs. 25,950 PKR per acre, the total income from brassica Rs. 34,090 PKR per acres. The area allocated to maize (fodder) crop was 15 acres from CP2 and CP6, where total input cost from maize (fodder) Rs. 23,100 PKR from CP2 and Rs. 23,800 PKR from CP6 per acre, the total income from maize (fodder) Rs. 31,200 PKR per acres generated both from CP2 and CP6. The area allocated to maize (grain) crop was 16 acres, where total input cost from maize Rs. 26,056 PKR per acre, the total income from maize Rs. 32,900 PKR per acres generated from CP1, CP2 and CP5 and Rs. 32,830 PKR per acres generated from CP3, CP4 and CP6. The grand total income from CP1 and CP2 crops were Rs. 101,900 PKR and Rs. 109,600 PKR. The net income attained from CP1 and CP2 were Rs. 54,384 PKR and Rs. 39,264 PKR. The grand total income from CP3 and CP4 crops generated were Rs. 122,730 PKR and Rs. 86,330 PKR. The net income attained from CP3 and CP4 were Rs. 75,454 PKR and Rs. 39,094 PKR. The grand total income from CP5 and CP6 crops were Rs. 99,117 PKR and Rs. 98,120 PKR. The net income attained from CP5 and CP6 were Rs. 43,611 PKR and Rs. 21,614 PKR. The above results showed that CP1, CP3 and CP5 are the highest yielding and net income generating patterns than CP2, CP4 and CP6 overall the total income generated from CP3 was highest among all cropping patterns in Peshawar region. It was concluded that CP3= Berseem (2cuts + seed) --Maize (grain) was more remunerative followed by all other patterns and are highly recommended for sowing on vast area for the farmers in Peshawar region subject to high net income.

Keywords: Cropping patterns, input cost, net-income, outputs


How to Cite

Masud , H., Haseeb , A., Ahmed , U., Ullah , I., Ali , S., Haseebullah, Rehman , S. ur, Taimoor , M., & Atif , M. (2023). Analyzing the Profitability of Crop Rotation Patterns in Peshawar, Pakistan. Asian Journal of Advances in Research, 6(1), 589–599. Retrieved from https://mbimph.com/index.php/AJOAIR/article/view/3729

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