Role of Genetic Markers in Deformation of Lip Prints: A Review

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Published: 2023-10-14

DOI: 10.56557/upjoz/2023/v44i213704

Page: 334-340


Bhumika M. N.

Department of Life Sciences, School of Sciences, CHRIST (Deemed-to-be-University), Bengaluru, Karnataka-560029, India.

Amit Chauhan *

Department of Life Sciences, School of Sciences, CHRIST (Deemed-to-be-University), Bengaluru, Karnataka-560029, India.

Pavana M. S.

Department of Life Sciences, School of Sciences, CHRIST (Deemed-to-be-University), Bengaluru, Karnataka-560029, India.

Sinchan Ullas Nayak

Department of Life Sciences, School of Sciences, CHRIST (Deemed-to-be-University), Bengaluru, Karnataka-560029, India.

Sujana S.

Department of Life Sciences, School of Sciences, CHRIST (Deemed-to-be-University), Bengaluru, Karnataka-560029, India.

Sujith P.

Department of Life Sciences, School of Sciences, CHRIST (Deemed-to-be-University), Bengaluru, Karnataka-560029, India.

Vedashree D.

Department of Life Sciences, School of Sciences, CHRIST (Deemed-to-be-University), Bengaluru, Karnataka-560029, India.

Fr. Jobi Xavier

Department of Life Sciences, School of Sciences, CHRIST (Deemed-to-be-University), Bengaluru, Karnataka-560029, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Cheiloscopy is an application of lip phenotypes (sub-clinical cleft phenotype/lip whorls) to establish the identity of an individual. Any kind of change in lips can be caused by facial expression/ facial movement and allow an accurate clinical assessment. All along an orthodontic estimation of lip protrusion, lip competence and lip lines are examined by visual inspection and are recorded in the medical notes. It has been shown in molecular studies that initiation and growth of facial primordia are restrained by an interaction between fibroblast growth factors, sonic hedgehog, bone morphogenetic proteins, homeobox genes Barx1 and Msx1, the distal-less homeobox (Dlx) genes, and local retinoic acid gradients. While mesoderm proliferation during facial development may cause inadequate growth of the maxillary, medial and lateral nasal processes. This review study is mainly focused on the determination of the responsible genetic markers for the deformation of lip prints. This summarized study can be helpful in the identification of an individual especially wherever lip prints are recovered from the scene of the crime.

Keywords: Genetic markers, deformities, mutations, cleft palate, lip prints


How to Cite

Bhumika M. N., Chauhan , A., Pavana M. S., Nayak, S. U., Sujana S., Sujith P., Vedashree D., & Xavier , F. J. (2023). Role of Genetic Markers in Deformation of Lip Prints: A Review . UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, 44(21), 334–340. https://doi.org/10.56557/upjoz/2023/v44i213704

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