Catechin as Natural Product Antifouling Agent against Biofilm Forming Bacteria from Visakhapatnam Coast, Andhra Pradesh, India

G. Sravan Kumar *

Department of Biotechnology, Gayatri Vidya Parishad College for Degree and P.G. Courses (A), Visakhapatnam, A.P., India.

Ilahi Shaik

Department of Biochemistry, Gayatri Vidya Parishad College for Degree and P.G. Courses (A), Visakhapatnam, A.P., India.

Hepzibah Rani Singh

Department of Biotechnology, Gayatri Vidya Parishad College for Degree and P.G. Courses (A), Visakhapatnam, A.P., India.

D. Sunil Kumar

Department of Marine Living Resources, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam, AP., India.

K. V. Siva Reddy

Department of Marine Living Resources, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam, AP., India.

Sridhar Dumpala

Department of Aquaculture, University College of Science and Technology, Adikavi Nannaya University, Rajamahendravaram, A.P., India.

G. Teja

Department of Marine Living Resources, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam, AP., India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

The aim of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of Catechin as natural product antifoulants (NPAs) by inhibiting bacterial growth. 10 different medicinal plants namely Pongamia pinnata, Mucuna pruriens, Garcinia cambogia, Acacia catechu, Curcuma longa, Curcuma xanthorrhiza, Coffea arabica, Griffonia simplicifolia, Bacopa monnieri and Piper nigrum extracts were evaluated for potential natural product antifouling agent. Of which Acacia catechu and Curcuma longa showed best results, a significant zone of inhibition of bacteria was achieved by aqueous catechin. The secondary metabolite catechin is obtained by performing TLC, further purified by HPLC. Acacia catechu has antibacterial activity even up to 50mg L-1. The proposed partial structure of Catechin a secondary metabolite (flavanoid) is obtained by the results of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Mass Spectra and IR Spectra.

Keywords: Acacia catechu, Curcuma longa, natural product antifouling, antibacterial activity


How to Cite

Kumar , G. S., Shaik , I., Singh , H. R., Kumar, D. S., Reddy, K. V. S., Dumpala, S., & Teja , G. (2023). Catechin as Natural Product Antifouling Agent against Biofilm Forming Bacteria from Visakhapatnam Coast, Andhra Pradesh, India. UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, 44(23), 1–10. https://doi.org/10.56557/upjoz/2023/v44i233755

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