INFLUENCE OF MATERNAL AGE AND CONSANGUINITY ON PREGNANCY OUTCOME IN SIVAGANGAI, TAMIL NADU, SOUTH INDIA

Main Article Content

T. SUBALAKSHMI
JEPA CHANDRA MOHAN
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2802-770X

Abstract

India is one of the developing countries, which has many types of sub population with peculiar culture practices. Consanguinity is one among them. The consanguinity may increase the chance of producing offspring with congenital anomalies and having adverse pregnancy out come. The maternal age of women plays an important role in delivering the healthy newborn. Maternal age is directly proportional to the adverse pregnancy outcome. The present study was aimed to calculate the adverse pregnancy outcome in Sivagangai population in relation to consanguinity and maternal age factor. Among the total population studied (8743), 11.1% were faced adverse pregnancy outcome. In the present study, 2.5% of spontaneous abortion, 0.4% of induced abortion, 1.8% of still birth, 2.4% of preterm birth and 3.7% of low birth weight was recorded, where 15.6% of negative pregnancy outcome was recorded in inbreeding population and 9.3% were recorded in out breeding population. The maximum adverse pregnancy outcome (90%) was recorded in the women aged between 30 to 35 followed by 18 to 21 group (21.8%).There are no well accepted measures in this area regarding this hereditary health problem associated with customary consanguinity. This community based study should be ideal for true and first hand estimation of congenital anomalies associated with negative pregnancy outcomes. Women who are in the later stages of their reproductive life are at great risk for having negative pregnancy outcome. Since the delivery outcome is associated with consanguinity and late marriage, this assessment is unique information to take necessary steps to prevent such health issues of future generation.

Keywords:
Consanguinity, maternal age and adverse pregnancy outcome.

Article Details

How to Cite
SUBALAKSHMI, T., & MOHAN, J. C. (2021). INFLUENCE OF MATERNAL AGE AND CONSANGUINITY ON PREGNANCY OUTCOME IN SIVAGANGAI, TAMIL NADU, SOUTH INDIA. UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, 42(2), 28-33. Retrieved from https://mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1905
Section
Original Research Article

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