AN ACCOUNT OF AMPHIBIAN DIVERSITY AND COMPOSITION IN THREE DIFFERENT HABITAT TYPES IN BAKSA DISTRICT, ASSAM, INDIA

ANAMIKA ADHIKARY

Department of Zoology, Gauhati University, Guwahati- 781014, India.

ANANDA RAM BORO *

Department of Zoology, Pandu College, Guwahati-781012, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Amphibian assemblages in three different habitat types, rice field; built up habitat and marshland were studied in the Baksa district of Assam, India. Visual encounter survey, opportunistic search and active search methods were used to record amphibians encountered. A total of 1410 individual amphibians were recorded that included 16 species belonging to 11 genera and five families. Among the three habitat types, built up habitat showed maximum species diversity followed by marshland and rice-field. It could be predicted that habitat heterogeneity and architectural complexity are the best predictors of amphibian diversity in the study area. The possible reasons correlating the composition have been discussed. This study indicates the importance of habitat as a resource in the conservation of amphibian species. Further, this happens to be the first report on amphibian assemblage from Baksa district, Assam, India.

Keywords: Amphibia, Baksa, built up habitat, rice field, marshland, species diversity, conservation


How to Cite

ADHIKARY, A., & BORO, A. R. (2022). AN ACCOUNT OF AMPHIBIAN DIVERSITY AND COMPOSITION IN THREE DIFFERENT HABITAT TYPES IN BAKSA DISTRICT, ASSAM, INDIA. UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, 43(3), 24–31. https://doi.org/10.56557/upjoz/2022/v43i32913

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