EFFECT OF LEAD, COPPER ON GLYCOGEN CONTENT IN MUSCLE, LIVER, GILL, AND KIDNEY TISSUES OF FRESHWATER FISH Labeo rohita

SHUBHAM R. KHADE

PES Modern College of Pharmacy, Nigdi, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune-411038, Maharashtra, India.

PALLAVI M. PATIL *

PES Modern College of Pharmacy, Nigdi, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune-411038, Maharashtra, India.

MAYURI B. SURYAWANSHI

PES Modern College of Pharmacy, Nigdi, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune-411038, Maharashtra, India.

SNEHA N. HOJAGE

PES Modern College of Pharmacy, Nigdi, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune-411038, Maharashtra, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Heavy metals harm the aquatic ecosystem by persisting in the environment and having the ability to bioaccumulate in aquatic species. Lead is a typical dangerous heavy metal with a very long biological half-life that is not biodegradable and is physiologically non-essential. The goal of the current study was to measure the amount of glycogen in Labeo rohita's muscle, liver, gills, and kidney after exposure to sublethal amounts of lead and copper for 4, 7, 15, and 30 days. The data showed a substantial drop in glycogen levels in the Labeo rohita experimental fish. Both the low concentration (26.426 mg/L) and the high concentration (75.467 mg/L) of muscle glycogen had decreased by a significantly significant amount (P 0.001) after 30 days compared to the control. The amount of hepatic glycogen (7.228 mg/g) was significantly (P 0.001) lower after 30 days compared to the control group. After 30 days of exposure, the reduction in gill glycogen content was found to be (0.689 mg/g) in high concentration and (1.2813 mg/g) in low concentration, in comparison to the control. Both the high concentration of renal glycogen (2.71 mg/g) and the low concentration of renal glycogen (3.16 mg/g) were found to be considerably lower (P 0.001) than the control at 30 days. The impact of poisonous Lead and Copper in some fish tissues was taken into account when evaluating the fish's response to a stressor. As a result, we can detect cadmium stress in fish by looking at their glycogen content.

Keywords: Lead, copper, Labeo rohita, fish, glycogen content, heavy metal


How to Cite

KHADE, S. R., PATIL, P. M., SURYAWANSHI, M. B., & HOJAGE, S. N. (2022). EFFECT OF LEAD, COPPER ON GLYCOGEN CONTENT IN MUSCLE, LIVER, GILL, AND KIDNEY TISSUES OF FRESHWATER FISH Labeo rohita. UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, 43(24), 452–457. https://doi.org/10.56557/upjoz/2022/v43i243345

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DOI 10.1007/s11356-017-9518-z