Diversity, Distribution Status of Butterflies of Nizamabad District Telangana State, in India

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Published: 2023-08-01

DOI: 10.56557/upjoz/2023/v44i163578

Page: 42-50


K. Vanaja *

Department of Zoology, Osmania University, Hyderabad, India.

M. Madhavi

Department of Zoology, Osmania University, Hyderabad, India.

L. Mahesh

Department of Zoology, Osmania University, Hyderabad, India.

T. Malsoor

Department of Zoology, Osmania University, Hyderabad, India.

S. Guruswamy

Department of Zoology, Osmania University, Hyderabad, India.

A. Shanthri

Department of Zoology, Osmania University, Hyderabad, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Among all insects, butterflies are the most recognisable and well-known. Lepidoptera is the name of the order that includes butterflies. In addition to being excellent indicators of climate change, butterflies significantly contribute to highlighting the astounding diversity of nature. Additionally, studying butterfly wing patterns offers a chance to discuss important topics in evolutionary developmental biology, such as the evolution of morphological innovations, limitations on evolutionary change, and phenotypic plasticity. Therefore, the goal of the current study was to ascertain the variety of butterflies in Telangana's Nizamabad district, which has a tropical monsoon environment. Between June 2022 and November 2022, a thorough survey of butterflies was carried out. 50 different species of butterflies were found in all. The Nymphalidae family dominated all other families, with 21 genera found across the Lantana spp. and Leonotis spp. of plants. Of The Lycaenidae, with 13 genera, was the second-most dominating family. Pieridae, which contained 11 genera, was the third prominent family. The final family had 5 genera and was called Papilionidae. The study's butterfly subjects were identified visually, and a Nikon D780 camera was used to snap pictures of them.

Keywords: Butterfly diversity, Lepidoptera, Nizamabad


How to Cite

Vanaja , K., Madhavi , M., Mahesh , L., Malsoor , T., Guruswamy , S., & Shanthri , A. (2023). Diversity, Distribution Status of Butterflies of Nizamabad District Telangana State, in India. UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, 44(16), 42–50. https://doi.org/10.56557/upjoz/2023/v44i163578

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