An Investigation on the Vestiges of Lyroderma lyra and Taphozous melanopogon Guano in Tirunelveli District of Tamil Nadu, India

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Published: 2023-10-09

DOI: 10.56557/upjoz/2023/v44i213695

Page: 244-250


Viji Siva Sakthi *

Zoology Department and Research Centre, Sarah Tucker College (Autonomous), Affiliated to Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, Tirunelveli, Tamil Nadu, India.

C. Indhu

Zoology Department and Research Centre, Sarah Tucker College (Autonomous), Affiliated to Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, Tirunelveli, Tamil Nadu, India.

I. Viji Margaret *

Zoology Department and Research Centre, Sarah Tucker College (Autonomous), Affiliated to Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, Tirunelveli, Tamil Nadu, India.

L. Jeyapraba *

Zoology Department and Research Centre, Sarah Tucker College (Autonomous), Affiliated to Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, Tirunelveli, Tamil Nadu, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Chiropterans are the major contributors to mammalian biodiversity. They play a dynamic role in the ecosystem as pollinators, seed dispersers and pest controllers. Among the biocontrol agent of the agro ecosystem, the bats play a major role as a control agent. Their roosting places are mostly near the human habitation and agricultural fields. They forage among the dry deciduous forest and also in the agro ecosystem of the plains. The purpose of this study was to determine the dietary content in the fecal matter of Lyroderma lyra and Taphozous melanopogon in Tirunelveli district, Tamil Nadu. Agriculture is the main resource in this area. The undigested parts in the guano was microscopically observed and identified up to order level. As L. lyra and T. melanopogon are the microbats their Pellet contain large amount of partly digested insect parts. Among them, the order Coleoptera was the most dominant food of L. lyra followed by the other orders whereas for T. melanopogon the most dominantly identified order is lepidopteran followed by the remaining orders. The bats play an important role as pest controller in the ecosystem and hence they need to be protected.

Keywords: Pellet analysis, pest controller, Lyroderma lyra, Taphozous melanopogon


How to Cite

Sakthi, V. S., Indhu, C., Margaret, I. V., & Jeyapraba, L. (2023). An Investigation on the Vestiges of Lyroderma lyra and Taphozous melanopogon Guano in Tirunelveli District of Tamil Nadu, India. UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, 44(21), 244–250. https://doi.org/10.56557/upjoz/2023/v44i213695

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