Proximate Analysis of Oecophylla smaragdina, an Edible Weaver Ant Consumed by Certain Tribes of Assam, India

Dipika Doloi *

Department of Zoology, Cotton University, Panbazar, Guwahati-781001, Assam, India and Department of Zoology, Barkhetri College, Nalbari-781126, Assam, India.

Devajit Basumatari

Department of Zoology, Cotton University, Panbazar, Guwahati-781001, Assam, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

In the field of entomophagy, the consumption of insects as a sustainable and nutrient-rich food source has gained increasing attention due to its environmental and nutritional benefits. There has been a growing curiosity and interest in the culinary world regarding insects as a source of food. Far from being a passing trend, the exploration of insect-based cuisine has opened up new dimensions in gastronomy. Among the edible insect species, Oecophylla smaragdina, known as the weaver ant, has emerged as a subject of fascination for its unique cultural significance, ecological relevance, and potential as a nutritional powerhouse. It is consumed by certain tribes of Assam during the primary spring festival in Assam. The study was done to determine the proximate analysis of Oecophylla smaragdina using standard methods. From the study, crude protein content was found to be highest amongst the proximate composition. Thus, this study provides valuable insights about the proximate composition of this insect. Moreover, it also adds another layer of importance as it is consumed during the primary spring festival in Assam, adding cultural significance to it.

Keywords: Entomophagy, weaver ant, nutritional, proximate analysis, crude protein, crude fat, crude fibre


How to Cite

Doloi , D., & Basumatari , D. (2024). Proximate Analysis of Oecophylla smaragdina, an Edible Weaver Ant Consumed by Certain Tribes of Assam, India. UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, 45(3), 208–213. https://doi.org/10.56557/upjoz/2024/v45i33893

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